Small Business Regions
Small Business Locations
Disadvantaged Communities Top 5%
Disadvantaged Communities Top 25%
Opportunity Zones
Phase 1
Phase 2
Phase 1 Proposed Station
Text-Only Version
  • County Impacts
  • Opportunity Zones
  • Small Business Participation
  • Disadvantaged Communities

Total Job-Years, July 2006 - June 2018

  • 0 - 10
  • 10 - 100
  • 100 - 200
  • 200 - 300
  • > 300

Opportunity Zones are census tracts designated by the Governor for which investments made by individuals through special funds in these zones would be allowed to defer or eliminate federal taxes on capital gains (initiated under the Federal Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017).

500 Certified Small Businesses working on the high-speed rail program statewide
164 Certified Disadvantaged Business Enterprises
53 Certified Disabled Veteran Business Enterprises
As of December 2018

California recognizes specific areas as disadvantaged communities based on a combination of environmental and socioeconomic factors. This analysis is conducted by the California Environmental Protection Agency (CalEPA) using a tool called CalEnviroScreen. Disadvantaged communities are defined as those that score in the top 25% of the most impacted communities based on an index made up of four components in two broad groups. Exposure and Environmental Effects components comprise a Pollution Burden group, and the Sensitive Populations and Socioeconomic Factors components comprise a Population Characteristics group.

About 54% of the total program investment of $4.8 billion from July 2006 – June 2018 occurred in designated disadvantaged communities throughout California, spurring economic activity in these areas. Similarly, over half (54%) of the FY 2017 - 2018 investment occurred in designated disadvantaged communities as well.

MAP ELEMENTS

Total Job-Years, July 2006 - June 2018

Opportunity Zones are census tracts designated by the Governor for which investments made by individuals through special funds in these zones would be allowed to defer or eliminate federal taxes on capital gains (initiated under the Federal Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017).

500 Certified Small Businesses working on the high-speed rail program statewide
164 Certified Disadvantaged Business Enterprises
53 Certified Disabled Veteran Business Enterprises
As of December 2018

California recognizes specific areas as disadvantaged communities based on a combination of environmental and socioeconomic factors. This analysis is conducted by the California Environmental Protection Agency (CalEPA) using a tool called CalEnviroScreen. Disadvantaged communities are defined as those that score in the top 25% of the most impacted communities based on an index made up of four components in two broad groups. Exposure and Environmental Effects components comprise a Pollution Burden group, and the Sensitive Populations and Socioeconomic Factors components comprise a Population Characteristics group.

About 54% of the total program investment of $4.8 billion from July 2006 – June 2018 occurred in designated disadvantaged communities throughout California, spurring economic activity in these areas. Similarly, over half (54%) of the FY 2017 - 2018 investment occurred in designated disadvantaged communities as well.

Direct Impacts are the economic effects generated by direct spending on a project. In the case of California high-speed rail, these impacts result from the Authority’s spending on Authority employees as well as its contractors (including both construction contractors and professional services).

Indirect impacts are the economic effects that occur in the next step in the supply chain. These impacts are dispersed among the industries that supply intermediate goods and services to firms with direct impacts. For California high-speed rail, these impacts can be observed in a diverse range of industries across the state—including, for example, the materials producers who supply the construction firms, as well as the technology vendors who service the professional service firms.

Induced Impacts are the economic effects that result when income earned by direct and indirect employees gets spent elsewhere in the economy. For example, both the civil engineer working full-time on California high-speed rail and the software engineer who codes a new version of AutoCAD spend their household income on housing, groceries, and other expenses in California.

In the context of the Program’s economic impacts, Job Years are defined as the equivalent number of one-year-long, full-time jobs supported by the project. For example, if one full-time job is supported for two years, it therefore represents two job-years.

Full-time equivalent (FTE) is a term frequently employed by agencies and other public employers. As described by the U.S. Government Accountability Office, an FTE is a measure of employment relative to the full-time hourly obligation for a given job (source). That is, if a job entails a 35-hour workweek with 15 days of paid time off, the FTE for that role would be equal to 1,700 annual hours—therefore, an employee who worked 850 hours in that role in a given year would be described as 0.5 FTE.

Labor Income/Earnings - In addition to jobs supported, input-output models (See Section 4.2.1 RIMS & IMPLAN Methodology for more information on input-output models) also report the labor income generated by the project. This figure includes all forms of employment income, including compensation (wages, benefits, and payroll taxes) firms paid to employees, and income earned by self-employed workers or unincorporated sole proprietorships.

Value Added/Gross Regional Product - For a specific firm or an entire industry, value added is the difference between total output—i.e., sales, other operating income, and change in inventory—and the cost of intermediate inputs required to produce that output—i.e., the goods and services purchased from other firms or industries.

A Small Business is a for-profit business concern that meets the certification requirements set forth in California Government Code Section 14837(d) and California Code of Regulations Section 1896.4 (Definitions) and 2894.12 (Eligibility) including but not limited to that its principal office is located in California, its owners reside in California, it not be dominant in its field and it have average gross revenue of $14 million or less over the previous three tax years. To be counted towards meeting the goals of the Small Business Program, a Small Business must be certified by the California Department of General Services.

A Disabled Veteran Business Enterprise is a for-profit business concern that meets the certification requirements set forth in California Military and Veterans Code Section 999(b)(7) including but not limited to at least 51% owned by a veteran of the United States Military who has at least a 10% service-connected disability. To be counted towards meeting the goals of the Small Business Program, a Disabled Veteran Business Enterprise must be certified by the California Department of General Services.

A Disadvantaged Business Enterprise is a for-profit business concern that meets the requirements of Title 49, Part 26.61 through 26.73 inclusive of the Code of Federal Regulations including but not limited to at least 51% owned by individuals who are both socially and economically disadvantaged. To be counted towards meeting the goals of the Small Business Program, a Disadvantaged Business Enterprise must be certified by the California Uniform Certification Program.

A Targeted Worker is an individual whose primary place or residence is within an Economically Disadvantaged Area or an Extremely Economically Disadvantaged Area in the United States. A Disadvantaged Worker is an individual who prior to commencing work on the high-speed rail project meets the income requirements of a Targeted Worker and faces at least one of the following barriers to employment: Being a veteran, being a custodial single parent, receiving public assistance, lacking a GED or high school diploma, having a criminal record or other involvement with the criminal justice system, suffering from chronic unemployment, emancipated from the foster care system, being homeless or, being an apprentice with less than 15% of the required graduating apprenticeship hours in a program.

Investment in the nation’s first high-speed rail system has created jobs and generated economic activity in numerous ways. High-speed rail contractors have hired workers throughout the state and these contractors have in turn paid suppliers for goods and services, further stimulating industries in each of the state’s megaregions. Together, these direct and indirect impacts have induced wider economic activity by pumping money back into California’s local economies. The Economic Impacts Map illustrates regional impacts of high-speed rail.

Disclaimer

The California High-Speed Rail Economic Impacts Activities interactive map is a high-level representation of high-speed rail project sections, existing and proposed stations, and planned/anticipated construction activity.

The content presented herein is informational only and should not be construed as final. The actual details, schedule and improvements for the project sections and stations are subject to change at any time without notice.

All persons and entities interested in submitting a bid with respect to any aspect of the proposed improvements should not rely on the information set forth in this map. The California High-Speed Rail Authority will not pay any claims based upon reliance on or interpretation of, the information set forth in this map.

The range of impacts shown was estimated using multiple industry-standard approaches, including a “top-down” analysis applying RIMS input-output multipliers to project expenditures to estimate impacts at the state level, and a more in-depth, “bottom-up” methodology that involved rigorous internal and external research on detailed project expenditures and customized geographic economic impact modeling using IMPLAN software. The analysis did not look at the wider economic benefits that high-speed rail service will bring to the California economy.

Please see the Technical Memorandum for the full Methodology and Assumptions used in this analysis.

View Technical Memo
Visual Map

(Totals may not sum due to rounding)
Totals Employment (job-years) Labor Income Economic Output
Direct Effects
Indirect Effects
Induced Effects
FY 2017-2018 Total
Program Total
(July 2006 – June 2018)

Investment in the nation’s first high-speed rail system has created jobs and generated economic activity in numerous ways. High-speed rail contractors have hired workers throughout the state and these contractors have in turn paid suppliers for goods and services, further stimulating industries in each of the state’s megaregions. Together, these direct and indirect impacts have induced wider economic activity by pumping money back into California’s local economies. The Economic Impacts Map illustrates regional impacts of high-speed rail.

Data Layer Menus

The left-hand Jump to menu includes multiple map display functions:

  • Select a Region link to auto-zoom into the economic region.

The right-hand Legends & Layers menu includes map display functionality to toggle map layers on/off, including Regions, County Impacts, Opportunity Zones, Small Business Participation, Disadvantaged Communities, and Stations.

Select Reset Map link to restore map display to original settings.

Map Functions

  • The map viewer includes a zoom tool to enlarge/decrease map display, designated by the "+" and "-" symbols.
  • Click-and-hold left mouse button anywhere on map to "drag" map display in any direction.
  • Hover mouse over any section of the Corridor Alignment for a label identifying Project Sections.
  • Select economic region area to view economic impact details.

Disclaimer

The California High-Speed Rail Economic Impacts Activities interactive map is a high-level representation of high-speed rail project sections, existing and proposed stations, and planned/anticipated construction activity.

The content presented herein is informational only and should not be construed as final. The actual details, schedule and improvements for the project sections and stations are subject to change at any time without notice.

All persons and entities interested in submitting a bid with respect to any aspect of the proposed improvements should not rely on the information set forth in this map. The California High-Speed Rail Authority will not pay any claims based upon reliance on or interpretation of, the information set forth in this map.

Glossary of Terms

Direct Impacts are the economic effects generated by direct spending on a project. In the case of California high-speed rail, these impacts result from the Authority’s spending on Authority employees as well as its contractors (including both construction contractors and professional services).

Indirect impacts are the economic effects that occur in the next step in the supply chain. These impacts are dispersed among the industries that supply intermediate goods and services to firms with direct impacts. For California high-speed rail, these impacts can be observed in a diverse range of industries across the state—including, for example, the materials producers who supply the construction firms, as well as the technology vendors who service the professional service firms.

Induced Impacts are the economic effects that result when income earned by direct and indirect employees gets spent elsewhere in the economy. For example, both the civil engineer working full-time on California high-speed rail and the software engineer who codes a new version of AutoCAD spend their household income on housing, groceries, and other expenses in California.

In the context of the Program’s economic impacts, Job Years are defined as the equivalent number of one-year-long, full-time jobs supported by the project. For example, if one full-time job is supported for two years, it therefore represents two job-years.

Full-time equivalent (FTE) is a term frequently employed by agencies and other public employers. As described by the U.S. Government Accountability Office, an FTE is a measure of employment relative to the full-time hourly obligation for a given job (source). That is, if a job entails a 35-hour workweek with 15 days of paid time off, the FTE for that role would be equal to 1,700 annual hours—therefore, an employee who worked 850 hours in that role in a given year would be described as 0.5 FTE.

Labor Income/Earnings - In addition to jobs supported, input-output models (See Section 4.2.1 RIMS & IMPLAN Methodology for more information on input-output models) also report the labor income generated by the project. This figure includes all forms of employment income, including compensation (wages, benefits, and payroll taxes) firms paid to employees, and income earned by self-employed workers or unincorporated sole proprietorships.

Value Added/Gross Regional Product - For a specific firm or an entire industry, value added is the difference between total output—i.e., sales, other operating income, and change in inventory—and the cost of intermediate inputs required to produce that output—i.e., the goods and services purchased from other firms or industries.

A Small Business is a for-profit business concern that meets the certification requirements set forth in California Government Code Section 14837(d) and California Code of Regulations Section 1896.4 (Definitions) and 2894.12 (Eligibility) including but not limited to that its principal office is located in California, its owners reside in California, it not be dominant in its field and it have average gross revenue of $14 million or less over the previous three tax years. To be counted towards meeting the goals of the Small Business Program, a Small Business must be certified by the California Department of General Services.

A Disabled Veteran Business Enterprise is a for-profit business concern that meets the certification requirements set forth in California Military and Veterans Code Section 999(b)(7) including but not limited to at least 51% owned by a veteran of the United States Military who has at least a 10% service-connected disability. To be counted towards meeting the goals of the Small Business Program, a Disabled Veteran Business Enterprise must be certified by the California Department of General Services.

A Disadvantaged Business Enterprise is a for-profit business concern that meets the requirements of Title 49, Part 26.61 through 26.73 inclusive of the Code of Federal Regulations including but not limited to at least 51% owned by individuals who are both socially and economically disadvantaged. To be counted towards meeting the goals of the Small Business Program, a Disadvantaged Business Enterprise must be certified by the California Uniform Certification Program.

A Targeted Worker is an individual whose primary place or residence is within an Economically Disadvantaged Area or an Extremely Economically Disadvantaged Area in the United States. A Disadvantaged Worker is an individual who prior to commencing work on the high-speed rail project meets the income requirements of a Targeted Worker and faces at least one of the following barriers to employment: Being a veteran, being a custodial single parent, receiving public assistance, lacking a GED or high school diploma, having a criminal record or other involvement with the criminal justice system, suffering from chronic unemployment, emancipated from the foster care system, being homeless or, being an apprentice with less than 15% of the required graduating apprenticeship hours in a program.

The range of impacts shown was estimated using multiple industry-standard approaches, including a “top-down” analysis applying RIMS input-output multipliers to project expenditures to estimate impacts at the state level, and a more in-depth, “bottom-up” methodology that involved rigorous internal and external research on detailed project expenditures and customized geographic economic impact modeling using IMPLAN software. The analysis did not look at the wider economic benefits that high-speed rail service will bring to the California economy.

Please see the Technical Memorandum for the full Methodology and Assumptions used in this analysis.